Sound Series by Clinton Harn


Clinton HarnWelcome to Film Sound Sessions with Clinton Harn. Film Sound Sessions is a collection of articles designed to educate and inform filmmakers on how to record exceptional audio for film and video. 

Clinton Harn has been working as a record producer, filmmaker, session musician, drummer and recording engineer for the past 15 years. He has been a lecturer at JMC academy for the last 10 years, where he teaches things like sound for film, music production analysis to effective business practices and copyright law. Clinton also runs his own production company specializing in music videos, documentaries, short feature films and sound for post and pre-production.  The man knows his stuff.

Check out the short videos below and his articles, all on getting the best sound.

 

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9 Responses to “Sound Series by Clinton Harn”

  1. Clinton Harn on December 14th, 2011 12:02 pm

    Thanks mate!!

  2. jim on June 6th, 2012 3:38 pm

    It is surprising and ironic that an audio tutorial that is supposed to be educational is marred by distracting background music.  What is the thinking behind this choice? 

  3. Conor on June 7th, 2012 11:27 am

    And it’s not surprising that they will always be a cynical or negative sod such as yourself that has nothing to offer either. If you don’t have anything constructive to say other than criticize something so trivial, than perhaps you could do something and show us how it should be done. Regardless of the “distracting” background music, as an aspirng filmmaker, I actually find this information useful.   

  4. Steve Weiss on June 8th, 2012 12:35 am

    With all due repsect, Jim emailed me before posting about the music with vocals under the OCN in Clinton’s piece.  I actually agreed with him. I really love music behind video but I’m not at all crazy about music with vocals unless the show moves to a B-Roll section where nobody is talking and you don’t essentially hear double talking.  I feel that dialouge and vocals are too competitive, together.  That being said I told Jim to post his question on this forum.  The whole point of a forum is to have these discussions and not just say we love everything.  I feel Jim’s question was to the point and not a personal attack so I have no problem with it.  We all learn by listening to one another.  That being said I think Clinton’s content is great and I wish it had a larger audience.  Unfortunately, all everyone cares about is pixel counting on cameras.  Such a waste considering I still use Varicams which are 12 year old technology (glorious, gorgeous 720, with fantastic glass with a servo zoom lens) and it still wins awards.  It’s not the gear, it’s skill is and always will be, how you use it.  Watch the shootout next Friday and this will become very apparent.  You will be shocked.

  5. Clinton Harn on June 8th, 2012 11:04 am

    Jim. I agree, the music is a little distracting. And yes, unfortunately, it had vocals. However, to be completely honest, it was somewhat of an experiment, and an intentional one too. As Steve stated, vocal music under dialogue can clash. In this instance, I love John’s music, wanted to use it, and went for a treatment with an intended tone & mood. An isolated call on my part. Sorry it bothered you

    The experiment part was rather interesting. Microphones, depending on polar pattern responses, can geneally pick up unwanted or extraneous noise if not utliized to its optimum. Figuratively speaking, mics don’t lie. They hear “everything”.

    Which brings me to the observation regarding “selective hearing”. Humans tend to listen to only the things they want to hear. Ever take a business call in a crowded mall, speak to your client and still comprehend what the conversation entails. Sure, the noise in the background is a pain in the ass, but the transaction continues because you are invested in the moment.

    Throwing a track as such into this video will yield 2 results:

    1) If the audience is focused on the subject nature, the “distracting music” would almost be perceived as non exisitent. It creates a subliminal mood along with the content. 

    2) Someone like yourself points it out :)

    So congrats Jim, you’re the first person in 6 months to finally bring it to my attention.

    As for Phil, Conor & many others, thanks for listening.

  6. Gustavo Grassano, argenina on June 16th, 2012 7:10 pm

    I really think that a background coral music among a speech will always disturb. But, in this case, I clearly heard and understud the Clinton’s voice, very well recorded and mixed out, and the background music dosen’t disturb me because of the treatment of it (volume, space “under”, equalization). If you are interested in hear wath Clinton says, you hear it. If you not, may be you are not a sound engineering. To dobe as one, you must focus in the sound you need to record… or hear. That`s the way. Congrat’s, Clinton. You’re sounds good to me. It’s all matter of technics. Jim, if you dont’t like it, show us what you do with sound. 

  7. Gustavo Grassano, argenina on June 16th, 2012 7:10 pm

    I really think that a background coral music among a speech will always disturb. But, in this case, I clearly heard and understud the Clinton’s voice, very well recorded and mixed out, and the background music dosen’t disturb me because of the treatment of it (volume, space “under”, equalization). If you are interested in hear wath Clinton says, you hear it. If you not, may be you are not a sound engineering. To dobe as one, you must focus in the sound you need to record… or hear. That`s the way. Congrat’s, Clinton. You’re sounds good to me. It’s all matter of technics. Jim, if you dont’t like it, show us what you do with sound. 

  8. Gustavo Grassano, argenina on June 16th, 2012 7:11 pm

    I really think that a background coral music among a speech will always disturb. But, in this case, I clearly heard and understud the Clinton’s voice, very well recorded and mixed out, and the background music dosen’t disturb me because of the treatment of it (volume, space “under”, equalization). If you are interested in hear wath Clinton says, you hear it. If you not, may be you are not a sound engineering. To dobe as one, you must focus in the sound you need to record… or hear. That`s the way. Congrat’s, Clinton. You’re sounds good to me. It’s all matter of technics. Jim, if you dont’t like it, show us what you do with sound. 

  9. Herschel (@HerschelHorton) on October 15th, 2013 7:57 am

    Thanks Clinton for taking the time to impart some of his knowledge to us fledgling film makers – my friends and I always say, sound is the glue of the final product – bad sound can kill great images and a great story!

    Thanks to Zacuto for sponsoring these types of videos!